3D ANIMATION

So much has been made of 3D, after all, it is cool. But in reality, it’s just another paintbrush. 

This particular kind of brush does some really novel things. 3D animation gives the viewer a window to things that are normally hard to see. Like molecular interactions that are too tiny and move too fast to be seen by the naked eye or even under a microscope. 3D animation can describe function and it can show form.  In doing so, 3D can reduce the staggering complexity within those systems and distill it down to something simple that anyone can understand.

3D also serves another purpose – not only can the viewer see things that exist at a molecular level, but we can also show them things that could be. For example, if one molecular process creates a certain effect, what would another process do? 3D allows portrayal of things that are, things that might be, and things yet to come. That’s the strength of 3D animation; giving people not only the ‘what’, but also the ‘what if’ and hopefully, the ‘why’. Together these give the viewer a more complete understanding of complex theories and processes.

Evelo Biosciences

A novel approach Evelo Biosciences is taking toward tackling disease, utilizing beneficial bacteria to deliver medicines via the gastrointestinal tract.

Boston Biomedical – Stat3

Created for Boston Biomedical to help explain the role of STAT3 in tumor production.

Allen Institute for Brain Research

A conceptual animation done for the Allen Institute for Brain Research, showing the formation of biological systems within a Zebrafish.

Unifarco Biomedical

Unifarco Biomedical asked us to create an animation detailing the mechanisms within the skin, as well as highlighting their novel topical formulation for treating atopic dermatitis (AD).

Innonix – Respokare

Innonix, makers of Respokare masks, approached us to help illustrate their new anti-pollution mask, and what differentiates it from other masks.

Boston Biomedical

Boston Biomedical asked us to create this animation to describe the role of MCL-1 in the inhibition of apoptosis in myeloid cell leukemia 1.

Degruyter/Energy Today Journal

Arkitek created this introductory animation for the re-launch of the Energy Today journal, published by DeGruyter.

Immunology of the Gut – Nature Immunology

This animation introduces the key cells and molecular participants involved in gut immuno-homeostasis and disease.

Scripps Institute of Oceanography

Scripps Institute of Oceanography asked us to create an animation that explains what atmospheric rivers are, and how they impact the US West Coast and beyond.

Arkitek Reel

A compilation of our work over the past several years.

Immunology of the Rheumatoid Joint

This piece dives into the role of various cytokines that drive the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

Immunomics Therapeutics

It’s novel technology harnesses MHC-II pathways to re-educate the immune system to respond to allergenic proteins as if they were pathogens. This animation describes their method.

RNA Interference – Nature Review Genetics

This revised animation of the popular RNAi animation build on the original version we did for Nature. Dr. Craig Mello, Nobel Laureate for Medicine in 2006, consulted on this project.

Stratos Genomics – SBX

Stratos Genomics’ method utilized reporters sandwiched between bases. The DNA chain was then read through nanopores at high speed, achieving extreme accuracy.

Beckman-Coulter – CESI 8000

Beckman asked us to create an animation detailing their flagship product, which utilizes high efficiency, high resolution electrophoretic separation of charged and polar molecules.

Nature Drug Discovery – Targeting Cancer Cell Metabolism

This animation focuses on how cancer cells metabolize glucose at such a high rate, turning ATP production on its head by converting pyruvate to lactate instead of using it to create more ATP.

SISCAPA Assay Technologies

SISCAPA Assay Technologies developed a novel method for detecting trace peptides in blood  samples by comparing wild and labeled peptides using mass spec techniques.

Exiqon – LNA

DNA switches between the S and N conformation. By locking the DNA into the N conformation using a methylene bridge the probes can withstand high temperatures, increasing specificity.

ABSciex – Crane2 4500 Mass Spectrometer

One of several biomedical devices we’ve animated for Sciex, this animation explains the features of the 4500 mass spectrometer.

Psoriasis and Beyond – Targeting the IL-17 Pathway

Another in a series about immunology for Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. It describes the mechanisms underlying psoriasis, and how the body’s immunological arsenal turns on itself.

ABSciex – SWATH

With ABSciex’ novel SWATH technology, one can gather ALL the information available in a mass spec sample, and can access that data later to compare different peptides in a sample.

Nature Immunology – Immunology of the Lung

This animation introduces the cells and immunological processes underlying the initiation and pathogenesis of asthma.

Rive Technology = Molecular Highway

Rive Technologies’ technology solved the problem of over-cracking hydrocarbons during the purification process by creating larger pores within zeolite crystals.

ABSciex – Sensibility 6500 Series

This was another in a series of animations done for ABSciex to illuminate the features of their latest mass spectrometer, the 6500 Series.

Nature Immunology – Immunology of the Skin

This animation explains the skin’s function as a protective barrier between us and the outside world. Without its arsenal of protective immune cells, we wouldn’t last long.

Allen Institute for Brain Research

Arkitek designed and produced this piece for the Allen Institute for their TED talk in 2011.

Unifarco Biomedical – Ceramage

This animation details the mechanisms involved in skin aging, called inflamaging, and the ways in which Unifarco Biomedical’s new product, Ceramage, combats the effects of aging.

CONTACT US

PH: (206) 286-0337

© 2020, Arkitek Scientific. All rights reserved.  California Privacy Policy.  Site Design by Lane Butz Design Group, Inc.